Gary Randall Photography
Umbrella Falls on Flickr.

Umbrella Falls on Flickr.

dadsaretheoriginalhipster:


Your dad was a photographer before you were and he’s got the lens collection to prove it. He was a f-stop ninja with a fifth degree black belt camera strap. He’s never missed a shot, including the shots he missed. His camera was an accessory to all of his illicit activities, and if it could speak, it would need counseling for the things that it has seen and been part of. 
So hipsters, when shooting shitty instagr.am shots of your hungover brunch and calling yourself a real photographer, remember this…
Your dad would never waste film on food because he was too busy capturing lady magic. 
P.S. That shoe box of old photos labeled, “Christmas of ‘69” isn’t full of the photos you think it would be. 
Thanks to Annarosebeck on tumblr for the photo. 

dadsaretheoriginalhipster:

Your dad was a photographer before you were and he’s got the lens collection to prove it. He was a f-stop ninja with a fifth degree black belt camera strap. He’s never missed a shot, including the shots he missed. His camera was an accessory to all of his illicit activities, and if it could speak, it would need counseling for the things that it has seen and been part of. 

So hipsters, when shooting shitty instagr.am shots of your hungover brunch and calling yourself a real photographer, remember this…

Your dad would never waste film on food because he was too busy capturing lady magic. 

P.S. That shoe box of old photos labeled, “Christmas of ‘69” isn’t full of the photos you think it would be. 

Thanks to Annarosebeck on tumblr for the photo. 

Walking with the boys on Flickr.Walking with the boys

Walking with the boys on Flickr.

Walking with the boys

The Saint of The Sunset on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Mount St Helens from near Vista Ridge on Mount Hood.

The Saint of The Sunset on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Mount St Helens from near Vista Ridge on Mount Hood.

Diamonds And A Ruby on Flickr.Via Flickr:
The stars push away the sunset as night falls over Ruby Beach on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington.

Diamonds And A Ruby on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
The stars push away the sunset as night falls over Ruby Beach on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington.

Stacked in My Favor on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Another shot from Ruby Beach on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington. This is a sea stack mirrored in the reflecting pool at sunset.

Stacked in My Favor on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Another shot from Ruby Beach on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington. This is a sea stack mirrored in the reflecting pool at sunset.

Morning Light on Flickr.Via Flickr:
A sunny Autumn morning in the Olympic Peninsula rainforest along a creek that feeds the Quinalt River.

Morning Light on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
A sunny Autumn morning in the Olympic Peninsula rainforest along a creek that feeds the Quinalt River.

Journey to The Stars on Flickr.Via Flickr:
I like to rock! 
The Milky Way over sea stacks at Ruby Beach on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington state.

Journey to The Stars on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
I like to rock!

The Milky Way over sea stacks at Ruby Beach on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington state.

Perseid Meteor Shower over Mount Hood on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Alright… here is the adjusted version of the last Perseid Meteor shot that received 17,500 views. 
Explanation follows.
The last meteor shot that I posted was just all of the meteors merged down without consideration to the fact that the Earth is rotating which moves the meteor’s point of origin as time goes by. The result is a group of meteors that look as if they are coming down in a totally random pattern, when in fact the Perseid’s originate near the part of the sky that the constellation Persius is located, thus their name.
And so, after much labor and calculation I have remade this shot and in doing so have taken into consideration the rotation of the Earth. This gives it a much more dramatic affect, especially with the stationary stars in the background. 
The Process:
Please read if you are curious about how this image was made.
First, this shot was made by setting up my camera on a tripod and programming my cable release to take 360 - 30 second exposures, which is 3 hours of time lapse. After which I downloaded all of the photos and separated each shot that had a meteor. I eliminated airplane trails and iridium flares. I then combined them all into layers over another 30 second exposure of Mount Hood, the lake and the sky. I then went about the painstaking task of masking out each meteor so the background would show through the layer. 
Once I have separated each meteor I returned to the beginning and located the axis of rotation at the North Star and then went about rotating each layer using Andromeda (?) as a reference point of location. 
After I had each meteor coming from the proper point of origin I merged them into one transparent layer and brightened them up and merged that layer down onto the bottom layer.
And this is the result. I’ve been working on this off and on for a week now trying to get it right.

Perseid Meteor Shower over Mount Hood on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Alright… here is the adjusted version of the last Perseid Meteor shot that received 17,500 views.

Explanation follows.

The last meteor shot that I posted was just all of the meteors merged down without consideration to the fact that the Earth is rotating which moves the meteor’s point of origin as time goes by. The result is a group of meteors that look as if they are coming down in a totally random pattern, when in fact the Perseid’s originate near the part of the sky that the constellation Persius is located, thus their name.

And so, after much labor and calculation I have remade this shot and in doing so have taken into consideration the rotation of the Earth. This gives it a much more dramatic affect, especially with the stationary stars in the background.

The Process:

Please read if you are curious about how this image was made.

First, this shot was made by setting up my camera on a tripod and programming my cable release to take 360 - 30 second exposures, which is 3 hours of time lapse. After which I downloaded all of the photos and separated each shot that had a meteor. I eliminated airplane trails and iridium flares. I then combined them all into layers over another 30 second exposure of Mount Hood, the lake and the sky. I then went about the painstaking task of masking out each meteor so the background would show through the layer.

Once I have separated each meteor I returned to the beginning and located the axis of rotation at the North Star and then went about rotating each layer using Andromeda (?) as a reference point of location.

After I had each meteor coming from the proper point of origin I merged them into one transparent layer and brightened them up and merged that layer down onto the bottom layer.

And this is the result. I’ve been working on this off and on for a week now trying to get it right.

My friends Chris, Ted and I went out tonight and shot under the light of the full moon. We were receptive to shooting Perseid Meteors but there weren’t so many, plus the sky was very bright from the full moon… so we decided to create our own meteor shower. This photo is of Ted spinning a flaming steel wool pad over his head. Pretty impressive meteor shower, no?